San Diego City Council approves hotel purchases for homeless housing

San Diego City Council members on Tuesday unanimously approved the purchase of two hotels that within two months could become permanent homes for 400 people now at a temporary shelter at the Convention Center.

While no one knows when the venue again will be used for conventions, ending the shelter prepares the city for when that day finally comes. The city opened the shelter in April out of fears that the coronavirus could spread at other city-run shelters, and as of Tuesday, there were 1,044 people staying at the Convention Center.

Council members also approved a one-year contract for People Assisting the Homeless to provide management and supportive services at the 190-unit Marriott Residence Inn at 1865 Hotel Circle South and approved a one-year contract for Father Joe’s Villages to provide the same at the 142-room hotel at 5400 Kearny Mesa Road. The Hotel Circle property cost $67 million and the Kearny Mesa property $39.5 million.

All 27 public speakers Tuesday addressed only the Hotel Circle purchase, with 11 in support. Opponents included residents of the nearby Mission Village Condominiums who had concerns about safety in their neighborhood, with a few speakers suggesting the city expand Downtown San Diego Partnership’s Clean and Safe program to their neighborhood.

Council members saw little problem with the purchases, though Councilwoman Jennifer Campbell asked if there would be communication with community members to address concerns brought up at the meeting.

San Diego Housing Commission President and CEO Rick Gentry said there already had been two meetings with neighborhood residents and business owners, and the commission was committed to holding more meetings periodically. He also said people with concerns about the project’s impact on their neighborhood could visit similar Housing Commission projects already operating.

Councilman Scott Sherman vouched for the Housing Commission’s track record by saying he can see the Zephyr apartments from his backyard in Grantville, and the building looks like any other hotel. The 84-unit project on Alvarado Canyon Road provides housing for formerly homeless veterans and opened last year after the Housing Commission bought and converted an old motel.

Responding to concerns some speakers had about the hotel being a magnet for homeless people seeking help, Sherman asked if services at the hotel would be available to anyone. Gentry said they only would be offered to residents of the hotel.

Speaking before the council Tuesday, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer said the Operation Shelter to Home program at the Convention Center had successfully housed more than 600 homeless people, and it was time to move on to a new phase that included more housing.

“Allowing people to live unsafely on the streets is not OK,” Faulconer said after the Tuesday vote.

The hotels will provide 400 rooms for people now at the Convention Center, while others at the venue will move back to city-run bridge shelters in tents or at Golden Hall. Gentry said the hotels should be ready for occupancy in December.

Atwood Hotel owner Cathy Herrick, one of two hoteliers

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He’s worked in the Northeast’s top kitchens, but nothing could have prepared Justin Urso for opening a hotel restaurant during COVID-19

Justin Urso, 32, has a stellar resume: Catalyst, Deuxave, and L’Espalier in Boston; Del Posto and Maze in New York City, where he worked under Gordon Ramsay. But nothing could have prepared him to open The Dial inside Central Square’s new 907 Main Hotel in September, when few people are visiting town and locals are reluctant to dine out. The restaurant has a global menu, though, and Urso is banking on people traveling to try his food.



a person posing for the camera: Chef Justin Urso opened The Dial restaurant at 907 Main in Cambridge's Central Square in September 2020.


© Handout
Chef Justin Urso opened The Dial restaurant at 907 Main in Cambridge’s Central Square in September 2020.

You’re the chef at a hotel restaurant that opened during a pandemic. How’s that been going?

Well, I mean, it’s been quite an ordeal. Just before COVID-19 hit, we were probably about three weeks to a month away from opening. And then COVID happened, and obviously our site got shut down. And then, once construction was allowed to resume, we went from being able to have five to 10 people working in a space together to only having one person in a room at a time, so then that delayed our construction.

So we’re open now, and we couldn’t be happier. I know times are tough, but as our owner has said, “Sometimes the best thing to do to get through a storm is to drive right through it.” So that’s what we’re doing; we’re full steam ahead and making the best of a bad situation. Opening has certainly been challenging with COVID, with all of the added safety measures — not that they’re a challenge, but it’s something new to get used to and train everyone on. . . . On top of all of the added stresses of opening a restaurant, it’s adding one more on top, but I think our team has done a fantastic job.

What sort of safety protocols did you have to learn? I think people would be really curious to know.

Aside from obviously wearing gloves and masks at all times, we stop service every hour to wipe down and sanitize all surfaces, which you can imagine during a restaurant service has its challenges, but safety is the number-one priority. So we literally stop every hour on the hour and sanitize every surface in the kitchen, and any high-touch points like the slicer, fry handles, underneath any refrigerator doors. All of our employees have to do wellness checks when they walk in the door. They get a temperature taken and fill out a questionnaire every single day.

Also, we recently installed some air-filtration systems. They’re from a company called Aura Air, and they’ve got four different types of filters: a HEPA filter, a copper filter, a UV filter, and an ion sterilization process. So our space is about as safe as you can make it during COVID, but it’s certainly all been things that we’ve had to learn.

What’s your your take on indoor dining? That’s a source of debate and concern for people. How you think

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From the hotel lobby to the ring — How the fight between Teofimo Lopez and Vasiliy Lomachenko came to be

Teofimo Lopez Sr. was in a hotel lobby in New York City in December 2018. The world didn’t know it yet, but when he ran into Vasiliy Lomachenko — the two-time Olympic gold medalist, three-division world titlist and boxing’s pound-for-pound king — and extended his hand, Lopez’s plan for his son was already in motion.

Lomachenko stared at Lopez, and as the father explained to Mark Kriegel last year, that look sent a message.

I’m better than you. Your son is not at my level.

But Lopez Jr.’s success was telling a different story. After starting his professional career in 2016 by racking up some impressive wins, he promised to “take over” boxing and laid out his path on making that happen — by defeating Lomachenko.

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7:30 p.m. ET Saturday on ESPN and ESPN Deportes: Vasiliy Lomachenko vs. Teofimo Lopez, 12 rounds, for Lomachenko’s WBO and WBA lightweight titles and Lopez’s IBF lightweight title

The Lopez family has been calling out Lomachenko for the past two years, predicting victory. On Saturday night, predictions and callouts will yield to one of the must-see fights of 2020 as Lopez faces Lomachenko in Las Vegas. Here’s a look at how Lopez earned his shot against Lomachenko, and the knockouts and banter that paved the way.


Oct. 10, 2016: Top Rank signs Teofimo Lopez Jr. to a multiyear promotional contract.

“I think this kid is a real talent,” Top Rank founder and CEO Bob Arum tells ESPN at the time. “The [matchmakers] are really high on him. He’s a real strong kid and has a really big future as a professional. He’s a good fighter.”

Lopez, 19 at the time, is already comparing himself with some of the greats.

“I’m an entertainer — got to entertain,” Lopez says. “My style — I’m technical, very technical. I’m very smart when I’m in the ring, like Albert Einstein. I’m like a Sugar Ray [Leonard], Floyd Mayweather. I’m a boxer, but if the knockout comes, it comes.”


Feb. 1, 2018: Lopez Jr. introduces the slogan “The Takeover” on Instagram ahead of his fight on Feb. 3, 2018, against Juan Pablo Sanchez in Corpus Christi, Texas. Lopez went on to win an eight-round unanimous decision in his eighth pro fight.


May 12, 2018: Lopez continues The Takeover with a first-round KO of Vitor Freitas. Lopez celebrates the victory with the “Take the L” dance from Fortnite. The fight is on the Lomachenko-Jorge Linares undercard at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York and the talk about a possible fight between Lopez and Lomachenko begins.

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Teofimo Lopez Jr. lands a grazing right hand that sends Vitor Freitas to the canvas, and he uses the “Take the L” dance from Fortnite.

“I love this. I live for this,” Lopez says. “I told you guys that this is ‘The Takeover.’ I’ve been training hard and

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The Future of Hotel Design

At Virgin Hotels in Chicago, Dallas and Nashville, and coming to Las Vegas early next year, the company’s app was made more robust this year to control room lights, temperature and television. Room configurations separate the back bedroom from the dressing room near the hallway with a barn door behind which guests can remain, allowing attendants access to make deliveries without contact.

“We don’t make you sign the room-service check,” said Raul Leal, the chief executive of Virgin Hotels. “That’s an archaic accounting tool.”

Not every hotel can offer outdoor dining year-round. Neither can their restaurants thrive with the capacity restrictions forced by social distancing requirements. The solution: Make the entire hotel a dining area. And throw in robotic servers.

“This is meant to be an answer to how do you deconstruct the restaurant experience so you don’t have to eat in one small place,” said Ron Swidler, the chief innovation officer at The Gettys Group, a Chicago-based hotel design, development and consulting firm. The Gettys Group recently convened with a consortium of 325 industry professionals from Hilton, Marriott and Cornell University, among others, to come up with the Hotel of Tomorrow project, collaborating on future hotel innovations. (The company has a track record with the workshop; in the early 2000s, it came up with the idea of a robotic butler, later developed by the Aloft brand of hotels as the Botler).

The think tank envisioned delivery units of various sizes that could keep food hot and drinks cold and provide video or music for entertainment.

“Maybe these robots have personalities and hang out with you,” Mr. Swidler added.

Even without robot partygoers, existing hotels have a great incentive to repurpose their now underutilized meeting rooms, ballrooms and even event lawns.

“We’re thinking the whole dining experience could change,” Mr. Ito, of Gensler, said. “You can create spaces around the hotel that aren’t necessarily in the restaurant, but become pop-up areas for private dining. It’s all about personalization and creating a unique experience.”

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Unique concert planned in October for towering Myrtle Beach-area hotel | Myrtle Beach Business

MYRTLE BEACH — Cliffhanger Productions plans to bring an electronic dance music, or EDM, concert to a hotel on South Ocean Boulevard where attendees will be able to enjoy the concert from the comfort of their hotel room.

DoubleTree Resort by Hilton in Myrtle Beach will host the ReVibe Wellness Retreat on Oct. 30-31, where 1,600 people are expected for the nearly sold-out event. The concert is being dubbed as “the first of its kind CDC-compliant vertical musical event on the East Coast.”

Michael Frits, general manager of the DoubleTree in Myrtle Beach, said the resort has seen an increase in revenue from their drive market cities, and so they’re targeting states that allow guests the option to drive in rather than fly, including North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, West Virginia, Alabama and Florida.

“We predict we will have attendees from as far north as New York and Massachusetts, as well,” Frits said.

Cliffhanger has a filed special events permit with Horry County. Frits said the resort has a permit that allows for amplified outdoor noise from 1 p.m. to midnight both Friday and Saturday. He said there shouldn’t be any concern about noise.

“Our oceanfront resort is great for hosting a vertical musical event since we have two towers with large connecting lawn spaces that will force sound to bounce off the hotel and be directed toward the ocean,” Frits said. 

Two stages will be set up to face the towers at the Doubletree. Owners of Cliffhanger bought out all rooms in both towers to ensure all visitors are specifically there for the concert.

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The concert is scheduled to feature artists including: Buku, Mersiv, TRUTH, and many more, according to the announcement.

Cliffhanger Productions produced a similar event in Calgary called the Diesel Bird Hotel Music Festival in August, which sold out.

Frits said with this being the first concert of its kind at the resort and Myrtle Beach, it would be difficult to put a financial impact of the show.

“Bringing new visitors to Myrtle Beach is always a benefit of hosting a large event like this and we’re proud to help give a boost to South Carolina tourism,” Frits wrote. “At the resort, our guests will be able to purchase food from multiple dining options during the weekend, including three restaurants on-property, but from seven local food trucks as well.”

Ticket prices start at $375 per person and can be purchased at ReVibeRetreat.com, where attendees can view the weekend lineup and choose their preferred tower.

Frits said he hopes this will offer concert promoters a viable alternative to large crowds pre-COVID.

“We hope to do more vertical concerts in the future and see the potential of offering a safe alternative to large gatherings,” he said. “We take the safety of our guests and employees very serious

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How has this hotel firm spent its PPP money? Eight members of Congress want to know

Eight members of Congress are calling on the Small Business Administration to investigate whether the operator of a luxury Santa Monica hotel and dozens of other properties properly spent tens of millions of dollars in pandemic relief funding.



a group of people that are talking on a cell phone: A group prays during an August demonstration supporting Margarita Santos, center, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the JW Marriott Santa Monica Le Merigot hotel. The hotel's operator, Columbia Sussex, received tens of millions of dollars in PPP loans. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
A group prays during an August demonstration supporting Margarita Santos, center, who was fired from her housekeeping job at the JW Marriott Santa Monica Le Merigot hotel. The hotel’s operator, Columbia Sussex, received tens of millions of dollars in PPP loans. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Irvine) and seven of her Democratic colleagues issued a letter Tuesday urging the SBA to investigate how a hotel conglomerate that owns or operates at least 50 hotels spent the money it received — as much as $63 million — from the Paycheck Protection Program.

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The group of lawmakers said in the letter that the PPP was designed to keep workers employed but that the hotel company, Columbia Sussex, accepted the funding through multiple affiliates and still laid off thousands of workers.

“Columbia Sussex appears to have taken advantage of these policies — borrowing taxpayer money at artificially low interest rates through multiple entities while laying off workers,” their letter to SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza says.

Phone calls and emails to the Kentucky headquarters of Columbia Sussex were not returned Tuesday.

The PPP, part of the $2-trillion stimulus funding package approved by Congress in March, was promoted as a tool for keeping workers employed during the economic crisis. But experts, academics and union leaders told the Los Angeles Times that loopholes and flaws in the program allowed businesses to accept millions of dollars in forgivable loans without retaining or recalling most of their workers.

The program requires loan recipients to use at least 60% of the money on payroll and lets them wait as late as December to spend that money on payroll. If the recipient doesn’t follow the guidelines, the loan is no longer forgivable — but it converts to a low-interest loan that is much cheaper than loans offered by traditional lenders.

The PPP launched in April with $349 billion for forgivable loans. Congress added $320 billion later that month. The program ended Aug. 8 with more than $100 billion left unused.

Columbia Sussex, through affiliates, employed about 6,500 people nationwide before the pandemic. Porter and her colleagues accused the hotel conglomerate of receiving the PPP funding through 17 affiliates, registered at the same Kentucky address, and double counting employees of the various companies to justify the need for more PPP money.

The letter asks the SBA to investigate the 17 loans and respond by Monday.

Porter’s office said the call for an investigation is supported by Unite Here Local 11, which represents thousands of hotel workers in Southern California and Arizona. The union has been critical of the Columbia Sussex-operated JW Marriott Santa Monica Le Merigot hotel, accusing management of firing a housekeeper after she was infected with COVID-19 and of

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On first anniversary of Hard Rock Hotel collapse, developer sues contractors, insurers | Courts

The company that owns the ill-fated Hard Rock Hotel in New Orleans filed suit this week against a host of construction contractors, subcontractors and insurance companies over the 2019 building collapse that killed three workers and injured dozens more.

The suit was filed in Orleans Parish Civil District Court late Monday, the first anniversary of the collapse of the upper floors of the 18-story building.



WWL logo

The ownership group, 1031 Canal Development, is led by Mohan Kailas. But company officials have said principals of two of the project’s main contractors — Denzel Clark, owner of general contractor Citadel Builders, and Todd Trosclair, owner of electrical contractor All-Star Electric — also owned a share.

The development company blames the building’s failure on Citadel, All-Star, Heaslip Engineering, architect Harry Baker Smith and 15 other subcontractors. Because of the company’s contract with Citadel to build the hotel at Canal and North Rampart streets, it also sued the insurance providers of each contractor and subcontractor.

The lawsuit takes particular aim at Heaslip, whom investigators for the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration have cited for several key violations. The development company’s suit asserts that Heaslip failed to design the proper support beams and columns or to calculate the proper loads that each floor could support. It branches out from there to the lead contractor, Citadel, and the various trades subcontractors.

Nearly a year after the top floors of the Hard Rock Hotel collapsed, killing three workers, injuring 18 others and straining city resources, N…

“Just as Heaslip did not run appropriate load calculations and analyses, neither did the general contractor or any subcontractor or supplier,” 1031 Canal alleges.

The owners also blame steel subcontractor Hub Steel for the way it fabricated and installed beams and metal decking on the upper floors. Metal decking was used like pans for pouring concrete on the top 10 floors of the building. An investigation by WWL television and The Times-Picayune | New Orleans Advocate in November showed how the gage of metal decking was changed and the spans required to support the decking with steel beams did not match what was in the structural plans.

“The decking system designed, manufactured and installed by Hub Steel was improperly erected and installed and/or was inadequately designed for the building,” 1031 Canal alleges.



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Demi Searls, 7, and Harlo Cartozzo, 8, write notes to their uncle Anthony Floyd Magrette who died in the Hard Rock Hotel construction site collapse in New Orleans, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Photo by Sophia Germer, NOLA.com, The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




The suit says the decking system caused too much weight to be placed on the 16th floor, which contributed to the collapse. It also asserts that “load calculations and analyses would have established that the building had structural problems,” but that no alarms were raised because the subcontractors either did not do the analyses or ignored the red flags raised by the tests.

Citadel either knew or should have known

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Red Roof Inn charges guest for smoking cleanup, but she doesn’t smoke. Money refunded

A Red Roof Inn.

A Red Roof Inn.

Q: My husband and I recently stayed at the Red Roof Inn in Gallup, New Mexico. We checked in late in the evening. We asked if they had any first-floor rooms because we are senior citizens, and they accommodated us.

When we got to the room, it had an awful odor, but we didn’t want to complain because they put us on the ground floor and we were tired and didn’t want to move. So we opened the door and tried to air it out the best we could.

After returning from our trip, I checked the credit card activity and noticed that there was a charge of $100 for a smoking fee. I called a manager at the Red Roof Inn. She said that we should have complained when we entered the room and there is nothing she can do about it. She said we were lucky they only charged us half the fee. I told her we requested a nonsmoking room, because we do not smoke. Why would we then smoke in the room? She said the cleaning lady said the room smelled of smoke and so we were guilty of smoking.

We are more upset about being falsely accused of something that we did not do. We are starting to think that this is some sort of scam. Please help us. — Mindy Haggerty, Pueblo West, Colorado

A: You didn’t smoke in your room. Therefore, you should not have to pay a smoking fee — or half a smoking fee. Goes without saying, right?

So what went wrong here? Easy. I think you were too polite. When you checked into a room that smelled like smoke, you should have said something. You were still being polite when you referred to it as an “odor.”

The last time I wrote about smoking fees in hotels, I had the audacity to say that if you smoke in your room, you should pay the cleaning fee. Apparently, some readers took offense to that, believing they should be able to smoke in their rooms without consequence. But that’s the world we live in.

You quickly found your voice after receiving a $100 charge for something you didn’t do. When the hotel refused to reverse the charge, you posted warnings on several websites and filed a BBB complaint. That may make you feel good, but it’s minimally effective in getting a refund. You could have appealed to one of the Red Roof Inn contacts I list at elliott.org/company-contacts/red-roof-inn/.

Red Roof did respond to you in writing about your complaint. It said when its housekeeper opened the room to clean it, “there was a strong smell of cigarette smoke.” The housekeeper contacted a front desk representative, who then accompanied the housekeeper to the room and verified that there was indeed a strong smell of smoke. Your room had to be closed for a few days while the hotel cleaned it. Still, Red Roof notes that it only charged you

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All-New stayAPT Suites Hotel Brand Launches in U.S.

MATTHEWS, N.C., Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — New hotel brand stayAPT Suites is providing U.S. travelers with an unmatched hotel experience as the venture launches nationwide this fall beginning with their first location, which opened October 1 in Goldsboro, N.C. Guiding the stayAPT Suites experience is a design philosophy that abandons the traditional one-room hotel layout in favor of a residential-feeling suite with intentional spaces.

stayAPT Suites kitchen view

Travelers visiting the Eastern region of the country will be among the first to utilize the game-changing layout marked by a dedicated living room, full kitchen, and separate bedroom. stayAPT Suites opens several new locations this fall and winter, including in Alexandria-Fort Belvoir, Va., Chattanooga, TN, Greer, S.C., Greenville, S.C., and Houston, TX. These locations are the first of 18+ hotels on track to open in the coming months from the hotel chain, which is headquartered in Matthews, N.C.

With hotel-lodging veteran Gary A. DeLapp at the helm, stayAPT Suites is poised for both a successful launch and long-term presence in the industry segment. President and CEO DeLapp is known for his notable contributions within the hotel industry, especially in the extended stay segment, with previous executive leadership roles served at Woodspring Suites, Extended Stay America, and Invitation Homes.

“For too long, it’s been status-quo for long-term lodging guests to sleep right next to a kitchenette,” said DeLapp. “Guests have always expected more, even if they felt they had to settle. Thanks to our unique room layout, stayAPT Suites is here to meet those expectations with space and in-room amenities that actually make life more comfortable away from home. I’m proud and excited to carry this vision nationwide, as we focus our efforts on enhancing the hotel-stay experience for travelers across the country.”

stayAPT Suites has plans to complete 100 corporate-owned and 200+ franchised locations throughout the country within the next 5 years. The brand will offer 2 and 3 story construction models ranging from 59 to 89 units. The development has no restricted territories and is designed to fit well in large, medium, or tertiary markets.

The new hotel offering is an attractive option for both guests and franchise owners with its midscale, never-before-seen designs, and efficient labor model, which calls for an average of 2.5 to 5 employees and provides very appealing cash-on-cash yields. The flexible prototype sizes and efficient land usage are ideal for sites ranging from 1.8 to 2.1 acres in size.

The first-of-its-kind concept offers widespread appeal to U.S. hotel travelers with its modern amenities and signature floor plan. Generously sized at an average of 500+ square feet, each suite is designed with an open-concept living room that includes a sleeper sofa, lounge chair, and wall-mounted 55-inch television.

The kitchen features a full-size stove, oven, dishwasher, microwave, and refrigerator; and between the kitchen and living room, guests can utilize the center island as a place to eat, finish working, FaceTime with family, or read the morning news.

The private, separate bedroom, located down the hall

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On one-year anniversary of Hard Rock Hotel collapse, developer sues host of contractors | News

The company that owns the ill-fated Hard Rock Hotel filed suit this week against a host of construction contractors, subcontractors and insurance companies for damages related to the collapse of the highrise last October that killed three workers and injured dozens more.

The legal action was filed in Orleans Parish Civil District Court late Monday, on the one-year anniversary of the collapse of the upper floors of the 18-story building.

The ownership group, 1031 Canal Development, is led by Mohan Kailas. But company officials have said principals of two of the project’s main contractors — Denzell Clark, owner of general contractor Citadel Builders and Todd Trosclair, owner of electrical contractor All-Star Electric — also owned a share.

1031 Canal places the blame for the building’s failure on Citadel, All-Star, Heaslip Engineering, architect Harry Baker Smith and 15 other subcontractors. Because of the group’s contract with Citadel to build the hotel at Canal and N. Rampart streets, it also sued the insurance providers of each contractor and subcontractor.

New Orleans sues owners of collapsed Hard Rock Hotel for $12M over cleanup, other costs

The lawsuit takes particularly pointed aim at Heaslip, which was cited for several key violations by investigators with the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration. It claims that Heaslip failed to design the proper support beams and columns or calculate the proper loads that each floor could support. It branches out from there to the lead contractor, Citadel, and the various trades subcontractors.

“Just as Heaslip did not run appropriate load calculations and analyses, neither did the general contractor, or any subcontractor or supplier,” the lawsuit alleges.



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Demi Searls, 7, and Harlo Cartozzo, 8, write notes to their uncle Anthony Floyd Magrette who died in the Hard Rock Hotel construction site collapse in New Orleans, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Photo by Sophia Germer, NOLA.com, The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




The owners also blame the steel subcontractor, Hub Steel, for the way it fabricated and installed beams and metal decking on the upper floors. Metal decking was used like pans for pouring concrete on the top 10 floors of the building. An investigation by WWL-TV and The Times-Picayune | New Orleans Advocate last November showed how the gage of metal decking was changed and the spans required to support the decking with steel beams did not match what was in the structural plans.

“The decking system designed, manufactured, and installed by Hub Steel was improperly erected and installed and/or was inadequately designed for the building,” the suit alleges.

The suit says the decking system caused too much weight to be placed on the 16th floor, which contributed to the collapse. It also claims that “load calculations and analyses would have established that the building had structural problems,” but that no alarms were raised because the subcontractors either did not do the analyses or ignored the red flags raised by the tests.

Citadel either knew or should have known there were structural stability

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