EU countries adopt common travel guidelines amid pandemic

European Union countries have approved a series of guidelines aimed at facilitating free movement across the bloc and avoiding further disruption during the coronavirus pandemic

During a meeting in Luxembourg, envoys for the 27 member states agreed on a common approach to travel restrictions and testing to help citizens and workers get more clarity on how they can transit across the continent.

In March, several EU nations hastily closed their borders in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus, even though the EU’s Schengen agreement allows residents to move freely between countries without visas. The action blocked traffic and medical equipment.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our daily lives in many ways. Travel restrictions have made it difficult for some of our citizens to get to work, to university or to visit their loved ones,” said Michael Roth, the German minister for Europe. “It is our common duty to ensure coordination on any measures which affect free movement and to give our citizens all the information they need when deciding on their travel.”

Member states agreed to provide coronavirus data to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which will publish a weekly map sorting regions according to the severity of coronavirus outbreaks.

The criteria used to define the colored zones — green, orange and red — are the number of newly notified cases per 100,000 in the past 14 days as well as the testing rate and the test positivity rate in the past week.

Member states agreed that they should not restrict free movement of people traveling from or to green areas, but national EU governments will continue to set their own restrictions such as quarantines or mandatory testing upon arrival for people coming from orange or red zones.

A region will be classified as green if the 14-day notification rate is lower than 25 and the test positivity rate below 4%. Under the criteria adopted Tuesday, most EU regions would be either red or orange.

“This agreement avoids border closures and favors the least penalizing health control measures, such as testing,” said Clement Beaune, the French minister for Europe. “Last but not least, essential movements, especially those of frontier workers, will be secured.”

The EU council said member states should not deny access to persons traveling from other EU nations and urged them to “respect the differences in the epidemiological situation between orange and red areas and act in a proportionate manner” if they decide to apply restrictions.

EU countries also agreed to provide timely information to their neighbors about new restrictions — if possible 48 hours in advance — and to develop a harmonized passenger locator form for all means of transport.

The guidelines are not legally binding as border

Read more

Some Common Misconceptions About Business Travel

Whenever you come across a business traveler walking around the airport, there are many thoughts that cross your mind. Let me begin by warning you, a lot of these might be wrong.

Business travelers face plenty of challenges. Always racing against time, they are constantly going from one airport to another, catching one flight to another. Lack of sleep, longer than expected working hours and sometimes even skipping meals are what a lot of travelers can tell about their trips. Naturally, it is not easy to cope up with such a routine and only the toughest manage to survive.

Traveling faces a lot of misconceptions. Here are some of the top of these.

1. It’s Always about Pleasures

Typically, whenever you hear of business travelers a lot of people think this trip is all about pleasures. Of course, all they can think about at that time is a paid trip, free air travel and all the other expenses.

It’s true that most of the companies pay for the entire trip. However, it’s way more than free meals and a stay at luxurious hotels. A business travel person often have to sacrifice a lot of their leisure time in order to meet deadlines and fulfill tasks.

2. They Travel in Style

It’s true that business travelers mostly have a charismatic personality and no matter how many insomniac days they’ve lived, they’d always travel in style. But the definition of style for many is entirely a different one. When you think of business travelers, you are automatically inclined to think that they must be traveling through the luxurious classes of the airline and staying at the most royal hotels.

The truth is, not many companies are able to afford this. Many business travelers commonly fly through the economy class and stay at the budgeted hotels.

3. Formal Clothing

It’s always desired to arrive at a meeting looking your best. However, the luggage restrictions can often make it hard to carry your best suit to a foreign land for the business meetings. It’s a huge relief that the businessmen all around the globe understand this restriction.

So the next time you’re eager to spot a traveler, they don’t always have to be in a suit to qualify as one. A fine looking pair of trousers and dress shirt would do an equally good job. A suit is no longer a qualification criterion of being a businessman.

4. A Lot of Work is Done

Of course, the trip is planned to get certain projects fulfilled. However, this is not always the case. Business traveling may not be always as successful as what the company has planned.

At times, business trips mean no work actually gets done. However, that trip might open more pathways to future successes. The trip might keep you very busy, but the company might not get the desired results.…

Read more

Avoid These Common Hotel Personal Injury Accidents

Vacation is supposed to be a fun time for friends and family. The thought of having an accident or getting injured is something we all worry about before taking a trip, so we take all the necessary precautions to ensure we remain safe while traveling. What we don’t normally think about is our personal safety at hotels and resorts. Surprisingly enough, many vacationers are injured before they even have a chance to leave their hotel. Hotel accidents are common causes for personal injuries while traveling, but they can be avoided with the right knowledge. Continue reading to learn the most common hotel accidents and what to do if you are seriously injured at a hotel or vacation resort.

Slip and Fall Accidents

Slip, trip, and fall accidents are among the most common personal injury claims in the hospitality industry. In fact, they are also one of the most common accidents at airports. There are various causes for slip and fall accidents at hotels, including wet floors, uneven pavement, defective stair rails, ripped carpeting, warped floorboards, obstructions like cords and wire, poor lighting, and much more. Injuries that result from such accidents usually include orthopedic injuries, muscle injuries, and head injuries. Hotels have a duty of care to ensure their premises is safe for guests and employees, which includes staying on top of floor cleaning, maintenance, and safety.

Swimming Pool Accidents

Swimming pools are a major liability for a hotel or resort since so many things can go wrong involving guests. Swimming pools are prime targets for accidents, including head injuries, slipping and falling, drowning, and more. It is important to supervise children at all times, and to take heightened precaution when navigating around pool decks. Hotels have a duty of care to ensure their pools are safe and up to code. Pool decks should be textured to prevent slips, pool stairs should be properly lit and marked, liability and lifeguard signs should be in clear view, the water should be properly treated on a routine basis, filters should be changed, the area should be well lit, and so forth.

Defective Furniture

Although it is not something that would be obvious to the average person, defective furniture is a common problem at hotels. Often times, hotels will attempt to cut costs by repairing broken furniture themselves, rather than replacing it with new furniture. Sloppy and inexperienced handy work renders furniture unstable, therefore, unsafe. If a guest is using a piece of furniture, such as a chair, and it has been poorly repaired or assembled by the hotel staff, it can break and cause injuries to the guest. This is especially dangerous for toddlers, young children, and the elderly.

Premise Liability

As mentioned, hotels have a duty of care to ensure their premises are safe for everyone. Failing to do so reasonably can result in a premise liability lawsuit. They are obligated to maintain a safe environment, and prevent accidents wherever hazards may appear. Any accident that was reasonably foreseeable and easily …

Read more