Just 18 states and territories NOT on N.J.’s updated COVID-19 travel advisory. Quarantine list hits new high.

New Jersey’s coronavirus travel advisory list expanded Tuesday to its highest number of COVID-19 hotspots since Garden State health officials started asking travelers arriving from those states and territories to quarantine for 14 days.

There’s now 38 states and territories on the quarantine list, with Michigan, Ohio and Virginia re-added on Tuesday. The list is updated weekly in a multi-state agreement with New York and Connecticut, and includes locations that reported a positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or 10% or a higher positivity rate over a 7-day rolling average.

New Jersey, itself, has recently come close to meeting those qualifications with a seven-day rolling average of 826 cases as of Tuesday. The state would need to average 888 new cases a day over a week to hit the 10 per 100,000 resident positive test rate.

Just seven states outside of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut have not been included on the travel advisory since it started in June, and some states have been added and dropped from the list multiple times.

The quarantine is voluntary and there are exceptions for business travel and people just passing through, but “compliance is expected,” according to New Jersey officials.

Here are the 18 states and territories not on the quarantine list:

American Samoa

Arizona (removed on 9/29/20)

California (removed on 9/15/20)

Connecticut

Hawaii (removed on 9/15/20)

Maine

Maryland (removed on 9/15/20)

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

Northern Mariana Islands

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Vermont

Virgin Islands (removed on 9/8/20)

Washington (removed on 8/11/20)

Washington D.C. (removed on 8/4/20)

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker 5/8 Newsletter 5/8 Homepage

Here are the 38 states and territories on the quarantine list as of Tuesday:

Alabama (added 6/24/20)

Alaska (re-added 9/1/20)

Arkansas (added 6/24/20)

Colorado (added 9/29/20)

Delaware (re-added 9/8/20)

Florida (added 6/24/20)

Georgia (added 6/30/20)

Guam (added 8/25/20)

Idaho (added 6/30/20)

Illinois (added 7/28/20)

Indiana (added 7/21/20)

Iowa (added 6/30/20)

Kansas (added 7/7/20)

Kentucky (added 7/28/20)

Louisiana (added 6/30/20)

Michigan (added 10/13/20)

Minnesota (re-added 9/22/20)

Mississippi (added 6/30/20)

Missouri (added 7/21/20)

Montana (re-added 9/1/20)

Nebraska (added 7/21/20)

Nevada (re-added 9/22/20)

New Mexico (re-added 10/6/20)

North Carolina (added 6/24/20)

North Dakota (added 7/21/20)

Ohio (re-added 10/13/20)

Oklahoma (added 7/7/20)

Puerto Rico (re-added 9/15/20)

Rhode Island (re-added 9/22/20)

South Carolina (added 6/24/20)

South Dakota (added 8/11/20)

Tennessee (added 6/30/20)

Texas (added 6/24/20)

Utah (added 6/24/20)

Virginia (re-added 10/13/20)

West Virginia (added 9/8/20)

Wisconsin (added 7/14/20)

Wyoming (added 9/22/20)

Arizona and Virginia were removed Sept. 29. California, Hawaii and Maryland were removed Sept. 15. The Virgin Islands were removed Sept. 8. Washington was removed Aug. 11. The District of Columbia was removed Aug. 4.

People flying into New Jersey are asked to fill out an electronic survey with information about their hometown, where they traveled from and their destination. The information is then sent to county health departments, who will call the traveler to request them to self-quarantine and explain where they can be tested for COVID-19.

Travelers can access the survey by

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Three states added to New York’s travel quarantine list; hot spots still an issue

This story was reported by Catherine Carrera, Matthew Chayes, Bart Jones, David Reich-Hale, Joie Tyrrell and John Valenti. It was written by Jones.

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Tuesday that Ohio, Michigan and Virginia were added to the list of states and territories with high levels of COVID-19 infection and from which travelers must quarantine for 14 days upon arrival here.

No places were removed from the list, which numbers more than 30 states and territories.

More schools on Long Island responded to new cases, while New York City schools reported a “really encouraging” result from recent testing, New York City Mayor de Blasio said Tuesday.

The positivity level from tests completed Monday across all of New York was measured at 1.2% outside of the “micro-clusters” the state is targeting, but rose to 4.13% in about 20 “hot spots” that the state is targeting in Brooklyn and Queens, along with Rockland and Orange counties.

States/regions in red are included on New York’s travel advisory list as of Oct. 13, 2020. Guam and Puerto Rico, not pictured, are also on the list.

The “red zone” level for neighborhoods with the most cases was up from the 3.7% the day before. Those areas are home to 2.8% of the state’s population, yet had 12.3% of all positive cases reported Monday to the state, Cuomo said.

“Our numbers overall continue to remain steady, despite the micro-clusters that have popped up in certain pockets of the state. Our strategy is to continue to identify these clusters if and when they pop up, get even more refined in our targeting and attack them as needed,” Cuomo said.

Eleven state residents died of coronavirus-related causes on Monday, and 923 people were hospitalized with the virus — an increase of 45 people from the previous day.

The positivity level for new confirmed virus cases was 1.1% on Long Island and 1.3% in New York City. The number was 101 in Nassau County, 68 in Suffolk County and 545 in New York City.

State Liquor Authority agents and State Police inspected 470 establishments on Monday and issued summonses to three of them — all in Nassau County — for violating state laws on mask-wearing and social distancing.

New York City found only one positive case of COVID-19 in public schools from random tests conducted on 1,751 people, including students and staff, at 56 schools.

The random tests began last Friday, de Blasio said Tuesday morning at his daily news conference, and the schools started to reopen last month for in-person classes.

“That’s really, really encouraging, and it says how important it is to constantly keep a lookout, and constantly focus on testing,” de Blasio said.

As part of a deal with the city teachers’ labor union, de Blasio agreed to a randomized, monthly testing

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CT’s Coronavirus Travel Advisory List: 3 States Added

CONNECTICUT — Gov. Ned Lamont added Ohio, Michigan and Virginia to Connecticut’s coronavirus travel advisory list Tuesday. No state or territory fell from the list, bringing the number of restricted areas to 38.

Under the most recent regulations released by Lamont, travelers from those areas either have to self-quarantine for 14 days or have proof of a negative coronavirus test result within 72 hours of arriving in the state.

States are put on the advisory list if they have a daily positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or a 10 percent or higher positive rate over a seven-day rolling average. Failure to complete a travel health form carries a civil penalty of $1,000 for each violation.

A total of 49 people have been fined so far, Hearst Connecticut reported. The fines total in excess of $53,000 and mostly involve people coming from Florida and North Carolina, Hearst reported.

Travelers who are required to self-quarantine may do so at their home, a hotel or other temporary lodging. Connecticut, New York and New Jersey asked hotels to communicate the quarantine requirements to guests who have traveled from one of the affected states.

There are some exceptions to the rule. Workers traveling from affected states to Connecticut and vice versa who work in critical infrastructure as designated by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, including students in exempt health care professions, and any state, local and federal officials and employees, are exempt from the quarantine requirement when such travel is work-related. Such essential workers are required to complete the travel health form, however.

While there currently are no Connecticut-imposed restrictions on international travel, the federal government continues to provide international travel recommendations for anyone living inside the United States. For guidance on international travel, see the “COVID-19 Travel Recommendations” published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See Also: CT Officials Warn Of Possible Coronavirus Spreading Scenarios

As of Tuesday, the following 38 states and territories are included in Connecticut’s travel advisory:

  1. Alabama

  2. Alaska

  3. Arkansas

  4. Colorado

  5. Delaware

  6. Florida

  7. Georgia

  8. Guam

  9. Idaho

  10. Illinois

  11. Indiana

  12. Iowa

  13. Kansas

  14. Kentucky

  15. Louisiana

  16. Michigan

  17. Minnesota

  18. Mississippi

  19. Missouri

  20. Montana

  21. Nebraska

  22. Nevada

  23. New Mexico

  24. North Carolina

  25. North Dakota

  26. Ohio

  27. Oklahoma

  28. Puerto Rico

  29. Rhode Island

  30. South Carolina

  31. South Dakota

  32. Tennessee

  33. Texas

  34. Utah

  35. Virginia

  36. West Virginia

  37. Wisconsin

  38. Wyoming

This article originally appeared on the Across Connecticut Patch

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PA Expands Travel Quarantine List Again, Now Up To 26 States

PENNSYLVANIA — The number of states on Pennsylvania’s travel quarantine list continues to grow, as health officials look to contain the spread of the virus from other hotspots around the country.

Alaska, Indiana, and North Carolina are now on the list, bringing the total number of states to 26. This comes just days after four new states were added on Oct. 7. In the last update, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming were put on the list.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health initially announced quarantine recommendations on July 2.

Here is the current full list of states which Pennsylvania leaders have identified as “at-risk” due to a high rate of the virus:

  • Alabama

  • Alaska

  • Arkansas

  • Florida

  • Idaho

  • Illinois

  • Indiana

  • Iowa

  • Kansas

  • Kentucky

  • Minnesota

  • Mississippi

  • Missouri

  • Montana

  • Nebraska

  • Nevada

  • North Carolina

  • North Dakota

  • Oklahoma

  • South Carolina

  • South Dakota

  • Tennessee

  • Texas

  • Utah

  • Wisconsin

  • Wyoming

Pennsylvanians who have been to these 26 states recently should quarantine for a full 14 days upon their return, authorities.

Travel increases your chances of getting coronavirus, health officials warn, and it’s recommended to avoid traveling for the time being if possible.

When the first travel quarantine list was put out, officials had included just 15 states.

This article originally appeared on the Montgomeryville-Lansdale Patch

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N.J. coronavirus travel advisory adds 3 states. Quarantine list now at 38 states and territories.

New Jersey on Tuesday added three states, Ohio, Michigan and Virginia, to its coronavirus travel advisory, bringing the list to 38 U.S. states and territories considered COVID-19 hotspots.

The state is asking travelers from 36 states and 2 territories to get a COVID-19 test and self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving in New Jersey. That includes Garden State residents returning home from a trip.

The advisory applies to any state or territory with a positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or those with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a 7-day rolling average.

The quarantine is voluntary and people traveling for businesses or passing through are exempted. But state officials say “compliance is necessary.”

New York and Connecticut have the same advisory and the same list in an effort to protect the region from the virus spreading.

States are added and removed every Tuesday. New York health officials run the calculations for who should be included.

The advisory now includes:

  • Alabama (added 6/24/20)
  • Alaska (re-added 9/1/20)
  • Arkansas (added 6/24/20)
  • Colorado (added 9/29/20)
  • Delaware (re-added 9/8/20)
  • Florida (added 6/24/20)
  • Georgia (added 6/30/20)
  • Guam (added 8/25/20)
  • Idaho (added 6/30/20)
  • Illinois (added 7/28/20)
  • Indiana (added 7/21/20)
  • Iowa (added 6/30/20)
  • Kansas (added 7/7/20)
  • Kentucky (added 7/28/20)
  • Louisiana (added 6/30/20)
  • Michigan (added 10/13/20)
  • Minnesota (re-added 9/22/20)
  • Mississippi (added 6/30/20)
  • Missouri (added 7/21/20)
  • Montana (re-added 9/1/20)
  • Nebraska (added 7/21/20)
  • Nevada (re-added 9/22/20)
  • New Mexico (re-added 10/6/20)
  • North Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • North Dakota (added 7/21/20)
  • Ohio (re-added 10/13/20)
  • Oklahoma (added 7/7/20)
  • Puerto Rico (re-added 9/15/20)
  • Rhode Island (re-added 9/22/20)
  • South Carolina (added 6/24/20)
  • South Dakota (added 8/11/20)
  • Tennessee (added 6/30/20)
  • Texas (added 6/24/20)
  • Utah (added 6/24/20)
  • Virginia (re-added 10/13/20)
  • West Virginia (added 9/8/20)
  • Wisconsin (added 7/14/20)
  • Wyoming (added 9/22/20)

Arizona and Virginia were removed Sept. 29. California, Hawaii, Maryland, and Ohio were removed on Sept. 15. The Virgin Islands were removed Sept. 8. Washington was removed Aug. 11. The District of Columbia was removed on Aug. 4.

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker | Newsletter | Homepage

Ironically, New Jersey has been inching closer to qualifying for the list.

It’s unclear exactly what that would mean. It’s possible New Jerseyans who travel to New York or Connecticut will be asked to self-quarantine for 14 days, unless they’re traveling for work.

Murphy said last week he doesn’t expect to have to issue another widespread state lockdown in New Jersey again, the way he did in March. Instead, he said, officials are more likely to institute more localized restrictions.

Asked last Thursday about what happens if New Jersey qualifies for the advisory, Murphy said state officials are “doing everything we can to keep it below the line.”

People flying into New Jersey are asked to fill out an electronic survey with information about where they live, where they traveled from, and their destination. The information is then sent to county health departments, who will call the traveler to request them to self-quarantine and explain where they can be tested for COVID-19.

Travelers can access the

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13-Year-Old Gave COVID To 11 Relatives Across 4 States During Family Vacation: CDC

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Nearly a dozen people across four states were infected with the novel coronavirus by a 13-year-old girl during a three-week family vacation over the summer, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The teenager, whose identity remains anonymous, was exposed to COVID-19 during a “large outbreak” in June, leading her to take a coronavirus test four days later. She tested negative and was not showing symptoms at the time, the report states.

But two days later, the teen began experiencing nasal congestion, a symptom of COVID-19, on the same day she, her parents and two brothers traveled to a family gathering at an unconfirmed location, where 14 of them stayed in a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house for between eight and 25 days.

The attendees ranged in age from 9 to 72 and belonged to five households in four states: Rhode Island, Illinois, Georgia and Massachusetts, according to the CDC report.

Six additional relatives (an aunt, an uncle, and four cousins) visited for 13 hours during the trip but maintained social distance and stayed outdoors. None of them tested positive for the virus.

Getty Coronavirus

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Including the teenage girl, 12 of the 14 relatives staying at the home – none of whom social distanced or wore masks — began exhibiting COVID-19-related symptoms and were subsequently found to have been infected with the virus.

One of the family members was hospitalized, according to the CDC, while another was treated at an emergency department care for respiratory symptoms. They have both recovered.

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Adeline Fagan, who was in her second year of residency, tested positive for COVID-19 in July

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After the CDC investigated the cases throughout July and August, the 13-year-old girl was determined to be the “index patient” given that she began showing symptoms prior to any other family member that was infected.

The teen’s initial COVID-19 test, done before the trip, was likely a false negative, according to the CDC report, “because it was performed before symptom onset.”

The CDC said that the outbreak further proves that children and adolescents can serve as the source of COVID-19 spreading, even when their symptoms are mild. In addition, it shows that lack of social distancing will likely result in further spreading of the virus, per the CDC.

As of Tuesday, there are over 7.8 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States, while at least 214,900 people have died, according to the New York Times’ database.

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Teen infected relatives in four states during family vacation, CDC says

In a recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report released by the CDC, 11 separate coronavirus cases across four states were traced back to one 13-year-old child.



a sign on a plant: coronavirus COVID-19 CDC HHS us centers for disease control and prevention department of health and human services federal agencies approve


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coronavirus COVID-19 CDC HHS us centers for disease control and prevention department of health and human services federal agencies approve

Exposure to the virus occurred during a three-week family gathering at which five families met. The age of the attendees ranged from 9-72 years-old. The families shared a five-bedroom, two-bathroom house and the CDC report points out that the family members did not wear masks or practice social distancing.

It should be noted that although several states began requiring masks to be worn in public in April, data confirming their effectiveness in combating the spread of the coronavirus was not known until late June and the shared house would not necessarily classify as a public space. Six relatives who later joined the event remained outdoors and practiced social distancing without staying at the house.

Of the 14 people who stayed inside the house, 12 were later diagnosed with COVID-19 after experiencing symptoms. None of the six people who stayed outdoors were diagnosed with the coronavirus.

The report used this incident to highlight that children and teens can be the source of COVID-19 outbreaks in their families even if their symptoms are mild and show the demonstrated benefit of social distancing.

The necessity to quarantine after possible exposure, even with a negative test, is also indicated in the report.

These recommendations come as President Trump recently held a rally in Florida on Monday less than 20 days after experiencing severe coronavirus symptoms. Trump’s doctor reported on Monday that he had tested negative for the virus on consecutive tests using the Abbott antigen test.

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CDC says teen gave COVID-19 to 11 relatives across 4 states during a family vacation.

A COVID-19 outbreak that infected 11 people across four states began with a 13-year-old girl who transmitted the virus during a three-week family vacation over the summer, according to a Centers for Disease Control report.

In Illinois – one of the states involved – a Cook County Department of Public Health spokeswoman said that the community where some of the family members live is not currently at risk from this particular outbreak, which occurred months ago.

But the case shows that kids and teens can contract and spread the virus, public health experts say. It also serves as a cautionary tale before the holiday season, a traditional time for many large family get-togethers.

“(The) outbreak highlights several important issues that are good to review before the holidays., a Cook County Department of Public Health spokeswoman said in an email.

The CDC noted that the case underscores the risk of exposure during gatherings, as well as the benefits of social distancing.

“SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) can spread efficiently during gathering, especially with prolonged, close contact,” the CDC report said. “Physical distancing, face mask use and hand hygiene reduce transmission; gatherings should be avoided when physical distancing and face mask use are not possible.”

The three-week family gathering involved five households from four states, according to the CDC report, which was released earlier this month. The report in a footnote mentioned public health departments in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Illinois and Georgia; it did not give any other information about where the family gathering took place or the states where various relatives lived.

The report said the initial patient, a 13-year-old girl, was exposed to COVID-19 during a large outbreak in June. A rapid antigen test four days after her exposure came back negative, before her symptoms began. Two days later she had some nasal congestion, her only symptom. That day she traveled with her parents and two brothers to attend a large family gathering, which began the following day, according to the CDC report.

She was one of 14 relatives ranging in age from 9 to 72 who shared a five-bedroom, two-bathroom home for eight to 25 days, the report said. The relatives did not wear face masks or practice physical distancing, according to the report.

Eleven other family members contracted the virus; one was hospitalized and another went to the emergency room for treatment of respiratory symptoms, but both recovered, according to the report.

“This outbreak highlights several important issues,” the report said. “First, children and adolescents can serve as the source for COVID-19 outbreaks within families, even when their symptoms are mild. Better understanding of transmission by children and adolescents in different settings is needed to refine public health guidance.”

Six additional family members did not stay at the home but did visit on different occasions, maintaining physical distance from relatives from other households. None of those individuals developed symptoms, and four tested negative for the virus, the CDC found.

“None of the six family members who maintained

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CDC says teen gave COVID-19 to 11 relatives across 4 states during a family vacation. Experts see a cautionary tale for holidays

A COVID-19 outbreak that infected 11 people across four states began with a 13-year-old girl who transmitted the virus during a three-week family vacation over the summer, according to a Centers for Disease Control report.

In Illinois — one of the states involved — a Cook County Department of Public Health spokeswoman said that the community where some of the family members live is not currently at risk from this particular outbreak, which occurred months ago.

But the case shows that kids and teens can contract and spread the virus, public health experts say. It also serves as a cautionary tale before the holiday season, a traditional time for many large family get-togethers.

“(The) outbreak highlights several important issues that are good to review before the holidays., a Cook County Department of Public Health spokeswoman said in an email.

The CDC noted that the case underscores the risk of exposure during gatherings, as well as the benefits of social distancing.

“SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) can spread efficiently during gathering, especially with prolonged, close contact,” the CDC report said. “Physical distancing, face mask use and hand hygiene reduce transmission; gatherings should be avoided when physical distancing and face mask use are not possible.”

The three-week family gathering involved five households from four states, according to the CDC report, which was released earlier this month. The report in a footnote mentioned public health departments in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Illinois and Georgia; it did not give any other information about where the family gathering took place or the states where various relatives lived.

The report said the initial patient, a 13-year-old girl, was exposed to COVID-19 during a large outbreak in June. A rapid antigen test four days after her exposure came back negative, before her symptoms began. Two days later she had some nasal congestion, her only symptom. That day she traveled with her parents and two brothers to attend a large family gathering, which began the following day, according to the CDC report.

She was one of 14 relatives ranging in age from 9 to 72 who shared a five-bedroom, two-bathroom home for eight to 25 days, the report said. The relatives did not wear face masks or practice physical distancing, according to the report.

Eleven other family members contracted the virus; one was hospitalized and another went to the emergency room for treatment of respiratory symptoms, but both recovered, according to the report.

“This outbreak highlights several important issues,” the report said. “First, children and adolescents can serve as the source for COVID-19 outbreaks within families, even when their symptoms are mild. Better understanding of transmission by children and adolescents in different settings is needed to refine public health guidance.”

Six additional family members did not stay at the home but did visit on different occasions, maintaining physical distance from relatives from other households. None of those individuals developed symptoms, and four tested negative for the virus, the CDC found.

“None of the six family members

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