Just 18 states and territories NOT on N.J.’s updated COVID-19 travel advisory. Quarantine list hits new high.

New Jersey’s coronavirus travel advisory list expanded Tuesday to its highest number of COVID-19 hotspots since Garden State health officials started asking travelers arriving from those states and territories to quarantine for 14 days.

There’s now 38 states and territories on the quarantine list, with Michigan, Ohio and Virginia re-added on Tuesday. The list is updated weekly in a multi-state agreement with New York and Connecticut, and includes locations that reported a positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or 10% or a higher positivity rate over a 7-day rolling average.

New Jersey, itself, has recently come close to meeting those qualifications with a seven-day rolling average of 826 cases as of Tuesday. The state would need to average 888 new cases a day over a week to hit the 10 per 100,000 resident positive test rate.

Just seven states outside of New Jersey, New York and Connecticut have not been included on the travel advisory since it started in June, and some states have been added and dropped from the list multiple times.

The quarantine is voluntary and there are exceptions for business travel and people just passing through, but “compliance is expected,” according to New Jersey officials.

Here are the 18 states and territories not on the quarantine list:

American Samoa

Arizona (removed on 9/29/20)

California (removed on 9/15/20)

Connecticut

Hawaii (removed on 9/15/20)

Maine

Maryland (removed on 9/15/20)

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

Northern Mariana Islands

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Vermont

Virgin Islands (removed on 9/8/20)

Washington (removed on 8/11/20)

Washington D.C. (removed on 8/4/20)

CORONAVIRUS RESOURCES: Live map tracker 5/8 Newsletter 5/8 Homepage

Here are the 38 states and territories on the quarantine list as of Tuesday:

Alabama (added 6/24/20)

Alaska (re-added 9/1/20)

Arkansas (added 6/24/20)

Colorado (added 9/29/20)

Delaware (re-added 9/8/20)

Florida (added 6/24/20)

Georgia (added 6/30/20)

Guam (added 8/25/20)

Idaho (added 6/30/20)

Illinois (added 7/28/20)

Indiana (added 7/21/20)

Iowa (added 6/30/20)

Kansas (added 7/7/20)

Kentucky (added 7/28/20)

Louisiana (added 6/30/20)

Michigan (added 10/13/20)

Minnesota (re-added 9/22/20)

Mississippi (added 6/30/20)

Missouri (added 7/21/20)

Montana (re-added 9/1/20)

Nebraska (added 7/21/20)

Nevada (re-added 9/22/20)

New Mexico (re-added 10/6/20)

North Carolina (added 6/24/20)

North Dakota (added 7/21/20)

Ohio (re-added 10/13/20)

Oklahoma (added 7/7/20)

Puerto Rico (re-added 9/15/20)

Rhode Island (re-added 9/22/20)

South Carolina (added 6/24/20)

South Dakota (added 8/11/20)

Tennessee (added 6/30/20)

Texas (added 6/24/20)

Utah (added 6/24/20)

Virginia (re-added 10/13/20)

West Virginia (added 9/8/20)

Wisconsin (added 7/14/20)

Wyoming (added 9/22/20)

Arizona and Virginia were removed Sept. 29. California, Hawaii and Maryland were removed Sept. 15. The Virgin Islands were removed Sept. 8. Washington was removed Aug. 11. The District of Columbia was removed Aug. 4.

People flying into New Jersey are asked to fill out an electronic survey with information about their hometown, where they traveled from and their destination. The information is then sent to county health departments, who will call the traveler to request them to self-quarantine and explain where they can be tested for COVID-19.

Travelers can access the survey by

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Cornerstone Collective Announces Nexus Design Standards To Provide Updated and Unified Safety Protocols for Hotel Industry

BOISE, Idaho–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Oct 13, 2020–

Officials of The Cornerstone Collective today announced a comprehensive program to provide hotel brands, owners and operators with a road map to design their properties safely, intelligently and prudently for today and the inevitable recovery from the Covid-19 virus. The proprietary Nexus Design Standards lay out specific criteria culled from across the full spectrum of expert sources, including the CDC, EPA, WELL, LEED, IBC, Fitwel, Mindful Materials and medical specialists. The program provides non-biased, research-based solutions that provide critical guidance for safe design, while allowing the ability to optimize the hotel’s uniqueness.

“A number of brands and hotel management companies have put together their own pandemic safety procedures, but no two are alike,” said Suzie Hall, founder and president, The Cornerstone Collective. “If an owner has multiple brands or owns an independent property, there is no trusted resource to assist them through what can be a costly process. The Nexus Design Standards are the first unified, all-encompassing approach that addresses all aspects of design for the ‘new normal.’ There is a lot of confusion and conflicting claims ranging from what constitutes appropriate distancing to what makes the most effective barriers. Not only do Nexus Standards include potentially life-saving advice, but they can substantially reduce costs by 15 – 40 percent. The Standards are supplier-agnostic but provide clear specifications on materials which often cost less than other options, even though the quality is similar if not superior.”

Hall has spent the last 28 years designing and advocating for how indoor environments can improve human health and well-being. With 20 completed LEED projects and dozens of healthcare assignments, she was ideally qualified to lead this initiative. “We’ve called upon our experience in designing hospital interiors, which present a higher concern for safety, as well as my current position on the Board of the St. Alphonsus Hospital Foundation. Utilizing that expertise, we worked with expert sources that form the core of the program.”

The new standards address ten key areas: Disinfectability, Cleanability, Performance, Health, Environmental, Price, Life Cycle Cost, Sustainability, Proof of Product Properties / Claims and Warranties. The below are specifics from three of the previously mentioned areas above:

Disinfectability

1. FFE upholstery must be sanctioned as disinfectable by the EPA.

2. Cleaning agents should be EPA-approved against COVID-19. Disinfection of surfaces and objects touched by multiple people is important.

3. When EPA-approved disinfectants against COVID-19 are not available, alternative disinfectants can be used (for example, 1/3 cup of 5.25%–8.25% bleach added to 1 gallon of water, or 70% alcohol solutions). Do not mix bleach or other cleaning and disinfection products together. This can cause fumes that may be extremely dangerous to enhale. Bleach solutions will be effective for disinfection up to 24 hours. Keep all disinfectants out of the reach of children.

Performance

4. All FFE upholstery should have an integrated fabric barrier system (mitigates pathogens and bacteria getting through)

5. Upholstery should be PVC, phthalate and formaldehyde-free

6. Minimum 50,000 double rub rating for upholstery

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