60% of Americans Won’t Travel to Visit Family for the Holidays This Year, New Survey Finds

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The majority of Americans say their holiday plans won’t be business as usual in 2020.

The ongoing novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is complicating plans for family gatherings and travel in the U.S. this winter. Sixty percent of respondents to Travelocity’s 2020 Holiday Outlook survey claim they won’t be traveling to see family and friends on Thanksgiving, Christmas and other holidays.

Of that group, 1 in 3 say they won’t be celebrating at all this year.

The survey, which was conducted in September, found, however, that not everyone is staying put at home however amid the health crisis. One in four people surveyed said they have a personal vacation planned later this year, while 45 percent of families with kids under 18 said they’ll be taking a trip before 2021 too.

“It’s going to be a nontraditional holiday season this year, so families are gearing up to make the most of it by planning a holiday away from home and using their vacation days to travel,” Katie Junod, general manager at Travelocity, said in a press release.

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The survey found that most who are traveling for the holidays this year aren’t waiting until the last minute. Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed said they’ve already booked their transportation and lodging for Thanksgiving and/or December holidays.

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Additionally, Travelocity indicated that a whopping 80 percent said they will be taking road trips as their preferred form of travel this season, while 1 in 5 will fly.

“Two-thirds of respondents said they’ve been able to travel to see friends and family since COVID-19 started, and almost half say they’re feeling happy and calm about the upcoming holiday season,” Junod said.

To see the full survey results, visit travelocity.com.

As information about the coronavirus pandemic rapidly changes, PEOPLE is committed to providing the most recent data in our coverage. Some of the information in this story may have changed after publication. For the latest on COVID-19, readers are encouraged to use online resources from the WHO and local public health departments. PEOPLE has partnered with GoFundMe to raise money for the COVID-19 Relief Fund, a GoFundMe.org fundraiser to support everything from frontline responders to families in need, as well as organizations helping communities. For more information or to donate, click here.

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Airlines and Airports Say EU’s New Travel Plan Won’t Revive Flights

(Bloomberg) — Airlines and airports said European Union moves to help restart flights in the region through a more coordinated approach to coronavirus-related travel curbs are wholly inadequate.



a close up of an airplane: A traveler at Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, France.


© Bloomberg
A traveler at Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, France.

The measures, adopted Tuesday, fail to propose the replacement of quarantine requirements with coronavirus tests and won’t stop states refusing entry from other EU countries, the International Air Transport Association said in a joint statement with Airports Council International and lobby group Airlines4Europe .

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The proposals backed by European Affairs Ministers seek to set a common threshold for entry restrictions, with unfettered travel allowed between areas with fewer than 25 new cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 people for the previous 14 days, and under 4% of tests showing positive results. None of the 27 EU states is below that threshold. Neither are the rules binding on governments.

“We are pretty disappointed,” IATA Director General Alexandre de Juniac said in a webcast briefing. “We were expecting the European Council at least to be open to replacing quarantines by testing.”

IATA also backs the reopening of borders between countries with similar infection rates and longer delays between the announcement of new measures and their introduction.

Countries across Europe have been sharpening restrictions after a resurgence in the pandemic, with 700,000 new cases recorded last week, the most since the start of the outbreak. That grinds against pleas by airlines to remove curbs they say are stopping people from traveling despite pent up demand.

De Juniac reiterated calls for further financial support for airlines and said he expects that some carriers won’t survive the winter at current occupancy levels. Companies in Latin America and Africa are especially exposed given a lack of state support there, he said.

ACI head Luis Felipe de Oliveira said he doesn’t expect government-owned airports to go bust but that privately controlled hubs in Canada, Europe, Asia and Latin America may be vulnerable.

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Covid Travel: Airlines and Airports Say EU’s Plan Won’t Revive Flights

A traveler at Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, France.

Photographer: Nathan Laine/Bloomberg

Airlines and airports said European Union moves to help restart flights in the region through a more coordinated approach to coronavirus-related travel curbs are wholly inadequate.

The measures, adopted Tuesday, fail to propose the replacement of quarantine requirements with coronavirus tests and won’t stop states refusing entry from other EU countries, the International Air Transport Association said in a joint statement with Airports Council International and lobby group Airlines4Europe .

The proposals backed by European Affairs Ministers seek to set a common threshold for entry restrictions, with unfettered travel allowed between areas with fewer than 25 new cases of Covid-19 per 100,000 people for the previous 14 days, and under 4% of tests showing positive results. None of the 27 EU states is below that threshold. Neither are the rules binding on governments.

“We are pretty disappointed,” IATA Director General Alexandre de Juniac said in a webcast briefing. “We were expecting the European Council at least to be open to replacing quarantines by testing.”

IATA also backs the reopening of borders between countries with similar infection rates and longer delays between the announcement of new measures and their introduction.

Countries across Europe have been sharpening restrictions after a resurgence in the pandemic, with 700,000 new cases recorded last week, the most since the start of the outbreak. That grinds against pleas by airlines to remove curbs they say are stopping people from traveling despite pent up demand.

De Juniac reiterated calls for further financial support for airlines and said he expects that some carriers won’t survive the winter at current occupancy levels. Companies in Latin America and Africa are especially exposed given a lack of state support there, he said.

ACI head Luis Felipe de Oliveira said he doesn’t expect government-owned airports to go bust but that privately controlled hubs in Canada, Europe, Asia and Latin America may be vulnerable.

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